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FAQ

FAQ Overview

The most frequently asked questions (FAQ) we receive are answered here.

There are two Q&A sections below:

1. Parent questions

2. Player questions

We are happy to field any other questions you have -- just email info@wwfha.com or call us at (425) 409-9448!

 

 

TEAM FAQ

If you would like more detailed information about each team, please go to the 'WA Wild Team' section, select the team you are interested in and select the FAQ for that team.

Parent Questions

  1. Why play for a girls' team?  
  2. When should my daughter transition from boys' to girls' hockey when 'everyone' says she should play boys as long as possible?  
  3.  Why not play boys' hockey up and until my daughter goes to college?  
  4.  What makes play in WWFHA so different or better?    
  5. How can my daughter check out a team before committing to play?  
  6. How do we know if my daughter will fit in skill-wise?  
  7. What Washington Wild gear is recommended / required?
  8. Where can my daughter learn to skate and learn to play hockey?    
  9. What are the costs?    
  10. What if my daughter is injured? Does she still have to pay?  
  11. Is financial assistance available?  
  12. Does WWFHA or teams participate in fundraising?
  13. Where can I track what is going on within the association and my team? Social Media?  Mobile app?
  14. How competitive are the teams and the leagues they play in?  

     

Parent Answers

1. Why play for a girls' team?

Answer
WWFHA’s commitment to girls’ hockey is 100%. We focus on the players, their goals, development, and hockey dreams. Playing on an all-girl team in WWFHA provides female hockey players with tremendous benefits.  Our well-qualified coaches are dedicated to and skilled in teaching the female hockey game, they communicate in a style designed to create rapport with the girls, and our hockey curriculum is developed specifically for girls. The Women's Sports Foundation says that girls participating in sports are more likely to:

  • earn better grades in and graduate from school,
  • demonstrate higher self-confidence and less depression,
  • maintain better body images and psychological states of well-being,
  • reduce the risk of osteoporosis and breast cancer by up to 60%,
  • learn about teamwork, goal-setting and the pursuit of excellence in performance
  • and learn about achievement-oriented behaviors—critical skills necessary for success in the workplace.

2. When should my daughter transition from boys' to girls' hockey when 'everyone' says she should play boys' hockey as long as possible?
 
Answer: It is up to the player when they make the transition to girls' hockey. We recommend transitioning at the age of 12 or 13 years old, but it is different for every player. Some choose not to transition to girls hockey until much later in life; however, they are less likely to adapt easily and quickly to the girls game, be seen by collegiate scouts, be recruited and be invited to play collegiate hockey, especially if they are playing on the west coast.

In fact, Kelly Katorji of Rush Hockey Showcases says it is fine to play boys’ hockey when first starting to play and especially when there is no other place to play. However, girls should consider making the transition to all-girl hockey when it is available so they can get used to the game and have exposure to collegiate scouts. The bottom line is that scouts for female collegiate teams will not be attending boys' tournaments.

3. Why not play boys' hockey up and until my daughter goes to college?

Answer
From past and present collegiate coaches and scouts, who we speak with on a regular basis, and the WWFHA board's and coaches' over 70 years of collective experience, we know it is a myth that a female player will be better if she play boys' hockey exclusively.

It becomes more and more difficult to transition to the female game and successfully adapt as a player gets older, which can make going to college that much more challenging.

Brian Idalski is entering his seventh season as Head Coach for the University of North Dakota (UND). He says, "Here is a little insight on what we focus on when recruiting: We really look for players from associations which focus on development."

Girls playing boys' hockey tend to have less touches of the puck, are less experienced in skating with the puck and have a great deal of trouble adjusting the first year they play all-girls' hockey.

Collegiate coaches say that it can take up to a year to change games, which is time that they don't have the luxury to waste; thus, they prefer that girls start playing the female game at a much younger age.

Also, a player is less likely to be seen by scouts when they play on a local boys team that does not travel to scouted girls' tournaments, especially if the team is located on the West Coast. It is imperative that female players are seen at all-girl tournaments which are attended by the scouts, as the scouts don't have the budget to travel to see one or two random players on a boys' team.

Coach Idalski: "We scout a few key tournaments each year in the mid-west and on the east coast." Yet another reason to transition to girls' hockey is that more and more season- and career-ending injuries are being reported by girls playing boys' house hockey.  

4. What makes play in WWFHA so different or better?  

Answer: WWFHA is exclusively dedicated to the girls' game and helping female players reach their specific goals. We are a tight-knit group with the common goal of focusing on what is best for each player rather than on generating income (we are a not-for-profit organization with very little overhead). We are the experts on coaching girls, the nuances of the girls' game, and how to achieve the highest levels of play. We are totally committed to girls' hockey.

5. How can my daughter check out a team before committing to play? 

Answer:  
 Each player may attend two practices for free on the their team of choice in WWFHA! Before joining us, why not meet the coaches, board members, players and families? Everyone is welcoming and the two free skates are a great way to ensure our association and team is for you! We are also available for evaluations, where we will come watch you play and talk to you about the best team for you.

6. How do we know if my daughter will fit in skill-wise? 

Answer
  We can talk to your former coaches, evaluate past palyer history, and/or perform a free evaluation where we assess your player and recommend the best team. In addition, each player may attend two practices for free on the their team of choice in WWFHA

7. What Washington Wild gear is recommended / required?

Answer:
 Each team has different requirements, but at minimum we would like player to purchase the Team track suit. If you buying new equipment, we prefer black helmets and gloves that are black, white and red (or a combination of those colors). Check out each Team's overview section for more information on requirements and preferences..  

8. Where can my daughter learn to skate and learn to play hockey? 

Answer:   
WWFHA offers beginner Hockey 1 - Learn to Skate and Hockey 2 - Learn to play classes. Check out the Beginner Overview page for more information

9. What are the costs? 

Answer:    Costs are divided into three categories.

1) Each player is a member of WWFHA and pays assocation dues which cover practice and game ice, referee fees, league fees and general operation costs.

2) Each player also pays into a Team-specific Slush Fund, which covers coaches' expenses, tournament fees, extra practice or game ice, and team-decided extras (for example, chocolate milk after games, year end party and gifts and more). The slush fund fee is split equally among the players of that team.

3) 'Soft' costs include personal expenses for travel (flight, hotel, meals), equipment and team apparel. Please visit each team's Cost Overview section to learn more.

10. What if my daughter is injured? Does she still have to pay? 

Answer:    An injured player must continue to pay WWFHA dues, and pay into the Team Slush Fund, even if she is not playing, except in the case of suffering a season-ending injury.

11. Is financial assistance available?

Answer: 
    Yes. WWFHA may have financial aid/scholarships available each season, based on donations, to help defray WWFHA Dues (scholarships do not apply to the Team Slush Fund, travel or other expenses). Scholarships are based on financial need. Contact the treasurer for more information on applying for a scholarship or download and submit these forms.

12. Does WWFHA or teams participate in fundraising?

Answer: 
WWFHA is constantly seeking sponsors and donations. Secured money will be applied to growth of the sport and keeping players' WWFHA dues as low as possible. Each season, each team will decide if they want to hold fundraising events to apply to Slush Fund or travel costs. All fundraising activities must be first approved by the WWFHA Board.    

13. Where can I track what is going on within the association and my team? Social Media?  Mobile app?

Answer
The WWFHA website provides up-to-date information on what is going on in the association, and each Team section will contain news, information, schedules, player stats and more.

We also utilize Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to give updates, which may  direct you back to the website for more details. Sport Ngin also offers a free mobile app that you can download (iOS and Android) and track each teams' news, schedules, rosters, stats and more.

14. How competitive are the teams and the leagues they play in?

Answer:  
   Each team is competitive in its own right. We work very hard for individual and team growth and development, which is measured shift-by-shift, game-by-game and from the beginning of the season to the end.

Long term development is our primary goal and we believe that the 12U, 10U and 8U team teams playing in the local co-ed league provides continuous challenge to the team, in addition to the girls' tournaments they attend.

The 19U Rep Tier 2/AA, 19U Rep Tier 3/A, 14U Rep Tier 2/AA, and 12U Rep Rep Tier 2/AA teams play in a competitive Canadian PCAHA girls' league and attends tournaments for accelerated growth and development, with the Rep Tier 2/AA teams attending more nationally competitive tournaments, going to USA Hockey Pacific District Championship Tournament and vie for USA Hockey Nationals Championship Tournament.

 

Player Questions and Answers

  1. Will I know anyone on the team?  
  2. Can I check out a team before I decide?
  3. Will I get to stay in the position I play on my current team? 
  4. What color gear should I have?  
  5. What team apparel should I have?
  6. Do I have to buy a jersey?
  7. Can I choose my jersey number?  
  8. What is it like driving to Canada every weekend? 
  9. Is there enough competition in girls's hockey? Playing boys' seems like it would be better.  
  10. Boys' hockey is faster and more aggressive; why would it benefit me to switch? 
  11. When should I transition from boys' hockey to girls' hockey?
  12. How do I know if I will fit in skill-wise? 
  13. Where do I get to travel?  
  14. How does traveling help me in the process of selecting a college and a team to play for? Will the team help expose me to college scouts? 
  15. Does the association explain the collegiate process and what to do on and off the ice to better my chances? 
  16. What is the attendance policy? What if I can't make a practice because I am sick? 

 

Player Answers

  1. Will I know anyone on the team?    
    Answer: Most likely. We have players from all over Washington state and beyond and most chances are you skated with them or against them at some time.  Even if you don't know anyone, the players are all friendly and welcome new players to join their team. Each team is like a big family!
  2. Can I check out a team before I decide?    
    Answer: We expect players to tryout for teams in early August; however, if it is mid-season and you want to transfer to the Washington Wild you can skate with a team twice for free before committing. We want you to meet the coach and the players so you can get to know the team. Everyone is very welcoming.
  3. Will I get to stay in the position I play on my current team?    
    Answer: Just let the coach know your current position and that is where you will start out. Over time, the coach will work with you to ensure that you are in the best position for your skills and natural ability. Nine times out of ten you will stay in the position in which you started. We encourage players to try all positions, especially at the younger ages, to get a greater understanding and perspective of hockey, which can only help in your overall game.
  4. What color gear should I have?   
    Answer: WWFHA's colors are red, white and black. We prefer black helmets, Washington Wild branded hockey black shells, and gloves that are black, white, and red (or 2 of the three). These items are mandatory for the Rep teams.
  5. What team apparel should I have?  
    Answer: At minimum, you should purchase a team track suit and hockey bag (required for Rep teams). The work-out shirt, shorts, hoodie, performance shirts and other apparel are optional.
  6. Do I have to buy a jersey?    
    Answer: No. You don't have to buy a Washington Wild team jerseys. The team's Jersey Manager will hand out, collect and launder your jersey for the season.
  7. Can I choose my jersey number?    
    AnswerJersey numbers are given based on player seniority. You will be asked for a first, second and third choice of available numbers. Numbers will be assigned based on the number of years of membership with the WWFHA family. If there is a tie with another player, it will be based on age and then a flip of a coin.
  8. What is it like driving to Canada every weekend?   
    Answer: It takes getting use to at first, but many players report they start to enjoy the ride and  the time in the car with their parents and teammates (when carpooling). Many use the time to do homework on the road. One senior even said she enjoyed it so much that she actually look forward to the time on the road with her mom!
  9. Is there enough competition in girls' hockey? Playing boys' seems like it would be better. 
    Answer: It is a myth that girls' hockey is not competitive. It is highly competitive, and the Canadian league teams play in are tough. Moreover, players learn the distinct nuances of playing the girls' game, which is important when your end goal is to play women's collegiate hockey. Making the full transition to the girls' game from boys can take from 6 months to a year, and it is best to do it early to adjust and start perfecting your game. Moreover, you will have the opportunity to touch and carry the puck more, be a leader, and advance your skills considerably compared to playing boys' hockey.
  10. Boys' hockey is faster and more aggressive; why would it benefit me to switch?    
    Answer: Boys' hockey is not necessarily faster or more aggressive. There is an actually a higher likelihood of injury in boys' hockey primarily due the size/weight different, which can impact your hockey career path if you have to miss a chuck of time as big as a season missed. Girls' hockey at higher levels is fast, competitive and very aggressive with less risk from the physical difference between genders.
  11. When should I transition from boys' hockey to girls' hockey?  
    Answer: It is up to you. We recommend at the age of 11 or 12 but it is different for every player. Some choose not to transition to girls hockey at all; however, they are less likely to be seen by collegiate scouts, get recruited and play college hockey, especially when they play on the west coast. While it is a personal decision for each player, we know from our coaches' and board's many decades of experience and from talking to college coaches and scouts that the older you are, the longer it takes to successfully switch games. Transition time makes going to college that much more challenging. It is a myth that you will be better if you play boys' hockey.
  12. How do I know if I will fit in skill-wise?    
    Answer: We can watch you play and advise you on which team to play for, and/or you can practice with a team twice for free. We want to work with you to put you on the team that fits your skill level, will challenge you and help you develop.
  13. Where do I get to travel?    
    Answer: Each team travels to different tournaments each year in the Northwest of the US and in Canada. The 19U Rep Tier 2/AA team travels to the mid-west and east coast for additional exposure to scouts in areas such as Chicago, IL (for the mid-west US collegiate scouts) and Rochester, NY (for the east coast collegiate scouts). The 19U Rep and U14 Rep Tier 2/AA teams travels the west coast for USA Hockey Pacific District Championship Tournament and across the country for Nationals.
  14. How does traveling help me in the process of selecting a college and a team to play for? Will the team help expose me to college scouts?    
    Answer: Yes. The 19U Rep team is designed so that you get exposed to collegiate scouts 2-3 per year, as recommended by college coaches as the best cost-conscious and most effective way to be seen. Going to scouted camps during the off-season is also important for additional exposure and to get to know the coaches personally as they work at the camps.
  15. Does the association explain the collegiate process and what to do on and off the ice to better my chances?    
    Answer: Yes. WWFHA writes articles and holds seminars on the lengthy and complicated process of marketing yourself to collegiate coaches and preparing for applying to schools. And, the association hold periodic workshops, invites guest speakers and supports players in this process. Players should make sure to do well on the ice, but more importantly, do well in school, get seen by collegiate coaches and connect with them on a regular basis.
  16. What is the attendance policy? What if I can't make a practice because I am sick?    
    Answer: The full attendance policy is located in the About section under WWFHA Policies. All players are expected to make a full commitment to all practices and games (league and tournament). Rare exceptions can be made by talking with the coach; however, each family needs to know that the absence of one player impacts the entirety of the team as rosters are often smaller than on age-matched boys' teams. Thus, we prefer to minimize unexcused absences. Check with the individual coach on the communication of absences in a timely manner.